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Discover Carmarthenshire from the 6 July

The good news is that you’re allowed to come and visit us in Carmarthenshire from 6 July as the 5mile travel restrictions are lifted by Welsh Government. You be able to visit some of our outdoor attractions such as The National Botanic Garden of Wales and Pembrey Country Park, plus you will be able to have a long-awaited holiday stay in one of our many accommodation providers from 11 July* and enjoy hospitality in our restaurants, pubs and cafes from 13 July**

The information on these pages may not reflect the current status of places to visit and what you can do. Please check with the places you intend to visit before travelling.

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RSPB Walk Rhandirmwyn

RSPB Walk Rhandirmwyn

This very beautiful walk around the RSPB Gwenffrwd/Dinas Nature Reserve is set in a quiet unspoilt part of Carmarthenshire.
Half of the recommended route is over rough terrain, but the remainder is accessible to most visitors. The boardwalk section gives good access to Alder woodland, beyond the boardwalk are ancient Oak woodlands and the upper River Tawe.

This RSPB managed reserve is a delight for anyone not only bird watchers. Four characteristic species of birds are to be found in summer in these upland oak woods – Pied Fly Catchers, Wood Warblers, Tree Pipits and Red Starts. The area was the last stronghold of the Red Kite, (once persecuted almost to extinction in Great Britain) they are regularly seen in this area now along with Peregrine Falcons and Buzzards.

Much of the route adjacent to the river Tywi and is rugged, uneven, rocky and slippery in places when wet. It is recommended that this section is best attempted by those who are able bodied and used to rough hill walking.

The approach from Llandovery alongside the River Tawe is delightful and the charming villages of Rhadirmwyn and Cilycwm have pubs, cafes and a post office.

     Map of walk with points of interest

 

Download the walk                    Plotaroute map

 

Why Walk?
This very beautiful walk around the RSPB Gwenffrwd/Dinas Nature Reserve is set in a quiet unspoilt part of Carmarthenshire. This RSPB managed reserve is a delight for anyone not only bird watchers. Four characteristic species of birds are to be found in summer in these upland oak woods – Pied Fly Catchers, Wood Warblers, Tree Pipits and Red Starts. The area was the last stronghold of the Red Kite, (once persecuted almost to extinction in Great Britain) they are regularly seen in this area now along with Peregrine Falcons and Buzzards. The approach from Llandovery alongside the River Tywi is delightful and the charming villages of Rhandirmwyn and Cilycwm have pubs, cafes and a post office

How Long?
The entire walk is 3.2km (2miles) long and has 104m (341ft) of ascent and descent.

How Hard?
Half of the recommended route is over rough terrain, but the remainder is accessible to most visitors. The boardwalk section gives good access to Alder woodland, beyond the boardwalk are ancient Oak woodlands and the upper River Tywi.

Starting point / Car Park – RSPB Gweffrwd/ Dinas Nature Reserve

Public Transport - Llandovery 16 km / 10 miles

Refreshments - ✘ but there picnic areas within the reserve

River Tywi

 

Points of Interest

1. In late spring and early summer Pied Flycatchers arrive and use the nest boxes each side of the boardwalk.

2. Grey Wagtails, Dippers and Pied wagtails may be seen on the riverbanks and river boulders looking for insects to feed on.

3. A path leads steeply off the main route to Twm Sion Cati’s cave, (the Welsh Robin Hood) he used these remote hills to avoid the authorities for years and was reputed to use a cave in this hillside.

4. The Oak woodland forms a part of the Cwm Doethie–Mynydd Mallaen Site of Special Scientific Interest and Special area of Conservation. These upland woodlands are sometimes termed Atlantic Oak Woodland or Celtic Rain Forest. The ground, trees and rocks (especially on the northern slopes) remain damp year-round which favours lower plant life like Lichens and Bryophytes, some of which are rare.

5. The upper river Tywi cascades over a jumble of large boulders before plunging into a deep pool at its confluence with the river Doethie - a particularly impressive scene when in flood.

6. The ground on the sunnier south facing slopes are carpeted in a delightful blue haze of bluebells in the spring and early summer.

7. Adjacent to the car park is St Paulinus Church, a Grade 2 listed building, thought to date back to 1617 and rebuilt in 1821. The bell dates back to 1897.

8. Less than 2km away at the end of the road is the impressive dam wall of Llyn Brianne reservoir, cloaked on all sides by extensive Pine Forests (car park provided).

 

Tywi Valley near Rhandirmwyn

Tywi Valley near Rhandirmwyn

The valley of Rhandirmwyn

Llansteffen

Llansteffan walk